Noteworthy News

Archive for health care reform

 

Safety Net Still Needed, Study Finds

Despite Affordable Care Act policies that have enabled millions of Americans to obtain health insurance, the health care safety net is still needed. Or so concludes a new report from the Georgetown University Health Policy Institute’s Center on Health Insurance Reforms. For the report A Tale of Three Cities: How the Affordable Care Act is Changing the Consumer Coverage Experience in 3 Diverse Communities, researchers visited and examined conditions in Tampa, Columbus, and Richmond (Virginia), and among their conclusions was: We still need a safety net. Safety net programs in existence before the ACA were expected to become less necessary once the [&hellip

New Medicaid Enrollees Cost Less to Serve

Contrary to fears that the long-time uninsured who became eligible for Medicaid under Affordable Care Act eligibility expansion would turn to providers with a long litany of expensive-to-treat medical problems, preliminary data suggests that such individuals are actually less costly to treat than the average Medicaid recipient. Preliminary data released by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services based on claims data from the first quarter of 2014 – the first time period after Medicaid expansion began in some states – found that the average new adult Medicaid enrollee cost $4513 to serve, as opposed to the $7150 it cost [&hellip

OIG Reveals 2016 Plans

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office of the Inspector General (OIG) has published its work plan for the 2016 fiscal year. In 2016, the OIG will continue to examine all aspects of HHS endeavor, including Medicare, Medicaid, hospital services, public health activities, and more. In the coming year it will continue a number of hospital-focused projects while also focusing more on health care delivery, health care reform, alternative payment methodologies, and value-based purchasing initiatives. Among the OIG’s planned Medicare projects in 2016 – some of them continued from the past and some of them new, quoted directly from [&hellip

States to Have New Reform Tool

Come 2017, states will have a new tool at their disposal through which to pursue health care reform. At that time, states will be able to seek new state innovation waivers from the federal government that will enable them to change covered benefits and insurance subsidies; replace health insurance exchanges; modify the individual or employer mandate; and do other things so long as their efforts ensure continued access to comprehensive and affordable health insurance. The waivers, created under the Affordable Care Act, are good for five years. The Commonwealth Fund has published an issue brief that explains the section of [&hellip

Looking at Payment and Delivery System Reform

Last fall the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation brought together grant recipients and national experts to talk about health care payment and delivery system reform design and implementation issues. Now, the foundation has released a brief paper that addresses what the experts consider to be the three greatest challenges in the pursuit of such reform: Aligning alternative payments with clinician compensation Considering social determinants of health in payment reform models Repurposing hospital resources The paper also takes a look at whether health care payments should be subject to risk adjustment to reflect the social and economic barriers to better health and [&hellip

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