Noteworthy News

Low-Acuity Use of Emergency Departments Declines

People are using hospital emergency departments less frequently for low-acuity medical problems, turning instead to retail clinics and urgent care.

According to a new study of a limited patient population published in JAMA Internal Medicine,

Visits to the ED for the treatment of low-acuity conditions decreased by 36% (from 89 visits per 1000 members in 2008 to 57 visits per 1000 members in 2015), whereas use of non-ED venues increased by 140% (from 54 visits per 1000 members in 2008 to 131 visits per 1000 members in 2015). There was an increase in visits to all non-ED venues: urgent care centers (119% increase, from 47 visits per 1000 members in 2008 to 103 visits per 1000 members in 2015), retail clinics (214% increase, from 7 visits per 1000 members in 2008 to 22 visits per 1000 members in 2015), and telemedicine (from 0 visits in 2008 to 6 visits per 1000 members in 2015). Utilization and spending per person per year for low-acuity conditions had net increases of 31% (from 143 visits per 1000 members in 2008 to 188 visits per 1000 members in 2015) and 14% ($70 per member in 2008 to $80 per member in 2015), respectively. The increase in spending was primarily driven by a 79% increase in price per ED visit for treatment of low-acuity conditions (from $914 per visit in 2008 to $1637 per visit in 2015).

Despite the emergency these ED alternatives, ED utilization continues to rise.

Learn more from the report “Trends in Visits to Acute Care Venues for Treatment of Low-Acuity Conditions in the United States From 2008 to 2015,” which can be found here, on the JAMA Internal Medicine web site.

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